Jewish Wedding Material

Reading from the Talmud: (Ketubot 8)

Blessed art though, O Lord, King of the Universe, who created mirth and joy, bridegroom and bride, gladness, jubilation, dancing, and delight, love and brotherhood, peace and fellowship. Quickly, O Lord our God, may the sound of mirth and joy be heard in the streets of Judah and Jerusalem, the voice of bridegroom and bride, jubilant voices of bridegrooms from their canopies and youths from the feasts of song. Blessed art though, O Lord, who makes the bridegroom rejoice with the bride.

The Seven Benedictions are as follows:

Blessed art Thou, O lord our God, King of the Universe who hast created the fruit of the vine. Blessed art Thou, O lord our God, King of the Universe who has created all things for His glory. Blessed art Thou, O lord our God, King of the Universe, creator of man. Blessed art Thou, O lord our God, King of the Universe who hast made man in his image, after his likeness, and hast prepared for him out of his very self, a perpetual fabric. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, creator of man. May she who was barren be exceedingly glad and rejoice when her children are united in her midst in joy. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, who makes Zion joyful through her children. O Lord, make these beloved companions greatly rejoice even as Thou didst rejoice at Thy creation in the Garden of Eden as of old. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, who makest bridegroom and bride to rejoice. Blessed art Thou, O lord our God, King of the Universe, who has created joy and gladness, bridegroom and bride, mirth and exultation, pleasure and delight, love, brotherhood, peace and fellowship. Soon may there be heard in the cities of Judah and in the streets of Jerusalem, the voice of joy and gladness, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride, the jubilant voice of the bridegrooms from the canopies, and of youths from their feasts of song. Blessed art Thou, O Lord who makest the bridegroom to rejoice with the bride.

Breaking of the Glass - Second Version

The final act of this ceremony is the shattering of the glass. This old custom has many traditions, with many interpretations. At one time it was meant to scare off demons who frequent celebrations. It was also meant to remind us on a happy occasion like this that the world is full of less fortunate people. It also reminds us of the destruction of the Temples in ancient Jerusalem. It also reminds us that it is our task to help repair this shattered world.

[Light bulb or glass wrapped in cloth. - Groom smashes it!]

All shout: Mazeltov!

Breaking of the Glass

The breaking of the glass at the end of a wedding ceremony serves to remind us of two very important aspects of a marriage.

The Bride and Groom and everyone should consider these marriage vows as permanent and final as the breaking of this glass is unchangeable.

But, the breaking of the glass is also a warning of the fragility of a marriage. That sometimes a single thoughtless act, breech of trust or infidelity can damage a marriage in ways that are very difficult to undo - just as it would be so difficult to undo the breaking of the glass.

Knowing that this marriage is permanent, the Bride and Groom should strive to show each other the love and respect befitting their spouse and love of their life.

All shout: Mazeltov!

The Seven Blessings

From "The New Jewish Wedding" By Anita Diamant

We acknowledge the Unity of all within the sovereignty of God, expressing our appreciation for this wine, symbol and aid of our rejoicing.

We acknowledge the Unity of all within the sovereignty of God, realizing that each separate moment and every distinct object points to and shares in this oneness.

We acknowledge the Unity of all within the sovereignty of God, recognizing and appreciating the blessing of being human.

We acknowledge the Unity of all within the sovereignty of God, realizing the special gift of awareness that permits us to perceive this unity and the wonder we experience as a man and a woman joined to live together.

May rejoicing resound throughout the world as the homeless are given homes, persecution and oppression cease, and all people learn to live in peace with each other and in harmony with their environment.

From the Divine, source of all energy, we call forth an abundance of love to envelop this couple. May they be for each other lovers and friends, and may their love partake of the same innocence, purity, and sense of discovery that we imagine the first couple to have experienced.

We acknowledge the Unity of all within the sovereignty of God, and we highlight today joy and gladness, bridegroom and bride, delight and cheer, love and harmony, peace and companionship. May we all witness the day when the dominant sounds through the world will be these sounds of happiness, the voices of lovers, the sounds of feasting and singing.

Praised is love; blessed be this marriage. May the bride and bridegroom rejoice together.

We Remember Him from The Yizkor Service (Yizkor, which means remembrance in Hebrew )

SHORT VERSION

In the rising of the sun, and in its going down

We remember him

In the blowing of the wind, and in the chill of winter

We remember him

In the opening of buds, and in the warmth of summer

We remember him

In the rustling of leaves, and in the beauty of the autumn We remember him In the beginning of the year, and when it ends We remember him.

LONGER VERSION

In the rising of the sun and its going down,

We remember them.

In the blowing of the wind and in the chill of winter,

We will remember them.

In the opening buds and in the rebirth of spring,

We remember them.

In the blueness of the sky and in the warmth of summer,

We remember them.

In the rustling of leaves and in the beauty of autumn,

We remember them.

In the beginning of the year and when it ends,

We will remember them.

When we are weary and in need of strength,

We will remember them.

When we are lost and are sick of heart,

We remember them.

When we have Joys we yearn to share,

We remember them.

So long as we live, they too shall live, For they are now a part of us,

As we remember them.

Traditional Jewish Prayerbook remembrance,

Regarding Jewish Wedding Ceremonies

All our wedding officiants are comfortable working with various elements of Jewish Wedding Tradition. Chuppah, the breaking of the glass (Mazel tov), working with guests of family members in the ceremony, etc.